Loading articles...

RCMP probing UCP firing of Elections Commissioner

Last Updated Feb 11, 2020 at 10:12 am MDT

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney speaks to the media while attending the Global Business Forum in Banff, Alta., Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Summary

Democracy Watch filed the complaints calling the firing an obstruction of justice


The Elections Commissioner position was dissolved last year under the UCP's Bill 22


CALGARY (660 NEWS) – A possible investigation into the firing of Alberta’s Elections Commissioner is now in the hands of the RCMP.

The allegations were raised after Commissioner Lorne Gibson was let go last year following the government’s decision to eliminate the position.

Gibson was investigating the 2017 UCP leadership race and had already issued thousands of dollars in fines in the alleged kamikaze campaign to prop up Jason Kenney.

RELATEDAlberta Elections Commissioner fines UCP leadership candidate

Edmonton police confirm the Mounties are looking into concerns brought forward by the advocacy group Democracy Watch.

Duff Conacher with the group believes this is obstruction of justice.

“The Kenney cabinet says it was just a political act, but they did it in the middle of investigations and they fired an election commissioner who had been investigating them and had fined members of their party to the tune of $180,000.”

Premier Jason Kenney said the Elections Commissioner position was unnecessary and removing it would save taxpayers about $200,000 a year.

The Opposition NDP has criticized the move with leader Rachel Notley going so far as to call Kenney the most undemocratic and corrupt premier in Alberta’s history.

WATCHNotley ousted from legislature after accusing House Leader of misleading comments

“Trying to stop negative consequences for the ruling party, that’s very dangerous to have politicians stepping in and trying to interfere with law enforcement,” said Conacher

He adds Democracy Watch has called on the RCMP to ask for a special prosecutor to oversee the investigation, as it would be a conflict of interest for Attorney General Doug Schweitzer or his deputy minister to oversee it.